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AIDSInfo-at-a-glance

Issue No. 38 | September 12, 2008
A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesView HTML version
News and Features 

Nominations for New Scientific/Clinical Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents Now Being Accepted

The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (or the Panel) is accepting nominations for new scientific/clinical members with expertise in HIV medicine. The Panel is particularly, though not exclusively, seeking candidates with expertise in viral hepatitis coinfections, HIV infected adolescents, viral resistance, nursing, pharmacology, biostatistics, and outcomes research. Panel members critically evaluate new information and prepare guidelines revisions. The candidates shall be recognized experts in HIV medicine with outstanding records of publications and presentations in areas related to antiretroviral therapy. The successful candidates shall serve a 4-year term beginning February 2009, with potential for reappointment for an additional term.

The Panel is a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health. The Panel is comprised of approximately 30 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, DHHS representatives, and community representatives with expertise in HIV management in the United States. The Panel meets monthly via teleconferencing and annually in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy and revise the "Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents." The guideline is a living document that can be found at http://AIDSinfo.nih.gov. This document is downloaded more than 5,000 times a day and is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers.

Panel members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is generally not provided.

The nomination should include a curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or letter of interest with specific reference as to how the nominee would contribute to the work of the Panel.  Please submit nominations to Alice Pau, Pharm.D., at the following address no later than September 30, 2008.

Alice K. Pau, Pharm.D., Executive Secretary, Division of Clinical Research, NIAID-NIH, Bldg 10, Rm 11C103, Bethesda, MD 20892 or e-mail to apau@niaid.nih.gov.

Nominations for New Community Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents Now Being Accepted

The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (or the Panel) is accepting nominations for new community representative(s) to serve a 4-year term beginning February 2009 with potential for reappointment. The Panel welcomes diversified representation in the community membership reflecting the demographics of the current HIV epidemic in the United States. The community member may assist the Panel in identifying and addressing unique treatment aspects that relate to the constituency he/she represents. The candidate shall have knowledge and involvement in issues related to HIV infection in adults, as evidenced by experience in HIV treatment education/advocacy or clinical/public policy initiatives related to HIV treatment.

The Panel is a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health. The Panel is comprised of approximately 30 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, DHHS representatives, and community representatives with expertise in HIV management in the United States. The Panel meets monthly via teleconferencing and annually in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy and revise the "Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents." The guideline is a living document that can be found at http://AIDSinfo.nih.gov. This document is downloaded more than 5,000 times a day and is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers.

Panel members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is generally not provided.

The nomination should include a curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or a letter of interest with specific reference as to how the nominee would contribute to the work of the Panel.  Please submit nominations to Alice Pau, Pharm.D., at the following address no later than September 30, 2008.

Alice K. Pau, Pharm.D., Executive Secretary, Division of Clinical Research, NIAID-NIH, Bldg 10, Rm 11C103, Bethesda, MD 20892 or e-mail to apau@niaid.nih.gov.

NIH: Herpes Virus Changes Acyclovir to Form that Inihibits HIV

"The drug acyclovir has long been used to suppress outbreaks of oral and genital herpes. Herpes viruses change acyclovir to a form that prevents them from reproducing.

Now, it appears that after acyclovir is altered by herpes viruses, it also interferes with the AIDS virus's ability to reproduce, report researchers from the National Institutes of Health and other institutions."

For more information, read the NIH press release.

CDC Releases New MMWR on Subpopulation Estimates from the HIV Incidence Surveillance System

"A new Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) titled 'Subpopulation Estimates from the HIV Incidence Surveillance System --- United States, 2006' was recently published by CDC. 

This report provides a more in-depth look at HIV incidence in specific U.S. populations. For the first time, CDC is able to provide detailed breakdowns of new HIV infections by race/ethnicity, gender, route of transmission, and age. These findings will allow CDC and its partners to target HIV prevention efforts and to evaluate their impact with more precision than ever before."

For more information, read the just released MMWR as well as a fact sheet and Q & A on the new report.

Study: HIV-Infected Patients Have Higher Risk of Fractures

"Reduced bone mineral density has been demonstrated among HIV-infected patients, but fracture prevalence is unknown. [...] The objective of the study was to compare fracture prevalence in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients. [...] Fracture prevalence was higher relative to non-HIV-infected patients among African-American and Caucasian females and Caucasian males."

For more information, read the study abstract.

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