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Issue No. 9  | February 22, 2008
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AIDSinfo.nih.gov is pleased to provide you with a weekly update of highlights about what has happened in the world of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and research. We hope you find this encapsulated view of HIV/AIDS news useful.

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Nominations for New Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Working Group on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of HIV-Infected Children

The HHS Working Group on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of HIV-Infected Children (the Pediatric Working Group) is accepting nominations for new members with clinical research and/or practice expertise in management of HIV infection in children to serve a 3-year term beginning in April 2008, with an option of renewal of membership at the end of the term. Three vacancies are anticipated.
 
The Pediatric Working Group, a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council (OARAC) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is composed of approximately 25 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, and HHS representatives with expertise in pediatric HIV management, as well as community representatives with knowledge of HIV infection in children. The Working Group meets monthly via teleconferencing and on occasion in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy in infants and children. The members actively engage in the preparation and update of the "Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection," which appears as a living document on the http://AIDSinfo.nih.gov Web site. This document is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers in the United States.
 
Working Group members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is not provided for participation.
 
The Working Group is currently seeking nominations for new members with expertise in pediatric HIV clinical trials, outcome research, and/or clinical practice who will work with other Panel members in critically evaluating new information and preparing revisions to the Pediatric Antiretroviral Guidelines. The candidates should have scientific expertise in pediatric/adolescent HIV infection as evidenced by meaningful contributions to peer reviewed journals related to pediatric HIV infection, participation in pediatric clinical research networks, receipt of NIH funding related to pediatric HIV infection as principal or co-principal investigator and/or clinical expertise in pediatric HIV infection as evidenced by more than 5 years experience in the field of HIV and ongoing participation in the clinical care of HIV-infected children/adolescents, and recognition of clinical expertise by peers (such as certification by HIV Medical Association/Infectious Disease Society of America, membership on HIV-related committees of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and consultant to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or World Health Organization on pediatric HIV-related issues). Because these are guidelines focused on pediatric antiretroviral management for the United States, candidates must be from the United States. Candidates should be willing to dedicate the necessary time to participate on the Working Group--a minimum of monthly conference calls and willingness to actively write revisions. The successful candidates shall serve a 3-year term starting in April 2008.

The nomination should include a curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or letter of interest outlining what qualities and contributions the candidate may bring to the Panel. Please submit nominations electronically (via email) no later than March 24, 2008, to Lynne M. Mofenson, M.D., Executive Secretary, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 4B11, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax:  301-496-8678; e-mail:  LM65D@nih.gov or Lynne.Mofenson@nih.hhs.gov
 


Community Member Sought for the DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of HIV-Infected Children

The Panel is also seeking nominations for two new community representatives to serve a 3-year term with potential for renewal. The Panel welcomes diversified representation in the community membership reflecting the demographics of the current HIV epidemic in the United States. The candidate should have knowledge and involvement in issues related to HIV infection in children, as evidenced by participation in Community Advisory Boards or liaisons to clinical centers or trials networks that include a focus on children, membership in relevant nongovernmental community organizations that have a focus on HIV-infected children, or experience in providing consultation on issues related to HIV in children to professional organizations or governmental agencies. Candidates should be willing to dedicate the necessary time to participate on the Working Group--a minimum of monthly conference calls and willingness to actively write revisions.

Interested candidates should submit their curriculum vitae or a pertinent biographical sketch and a letter of nomination or letter of interest outlining the experience and qualifications relevant to this position and the contributions the candidate is likely to bring to the Panel. Please submit nominations electronically  via email by March 24, 2008, to Lynne Mofenson, M.D., Executive Secretary, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 4B11, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax:  301-496-8678; e-mail:  LM65D@nih.gov or Lynne.Mofenson@nih.hhs.gov


 


Anti-HIV Microbicide Found Ineffective

Researchers in South Africa have determined that the anti-HIV microbicide carrageenan (Carraguard), was not effective in reducing rates of new HIV infection. In a Phase III study of 6,200 South African women receiving either carrageenan gel or placebo, the difference in the rates of new HIV infection among women in both groups was statistically insignificant. Only 10% of the participants reported using the topical microbicide as directed.

Carrageenan is the first microbicide to complete the third phase of testing. The study found no safety-related differences between women in either group, and gel-related side effects were minor and infrequent.

More information is available:
 

  • ClinicalTrials.gov: Phase III Carraguard Trial
  • AIDSinfo: Carraguard drug fact sheet
  • AIDSinfo Health Topics: Microbicides
  • USAID.gov: Microbicide fact sheet
  • DHHS Health Finder: News Story
     


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