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AIDSInfo-at-a-glance

Issue No. 37 | September 11, 2009
A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesView HTML version
News and Features 

Nominations Currently Being Accepted for New Scientific/Clinical Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents

The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (or the Panel) is currently accepting nominations for new scientific/clinical members with expertise in HIV medicine. The Panel is particularly, although not exclusively, seeking candidates with expertise in neurologic complications of HIV infection. Panel members critically evaluate new information and prepare guidelines revisions. The candidates must be recognized experts in HIV medicine with outstanding records of publications and presentations in areas related to antiretroviral therapy. The successful candidates shall serve a 4-year term beginning February 2010, with potential for reappointment for an additional term.

The Panel is a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health. The Panel is comprised of approximately 30 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, DHHS representatives, and community representatives with expertise in HIV management in the United States. The Panel meets monthly via teleconferencing and annually in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy and revise the “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents.” The guideline is a living document that can be found at http://AIDSinfo.nih.gov. This document is downloaded more than 5,000 times a day and is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers.

Panel members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is generally not provided.

The nomination should include a curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or letter of interest with specific reference to how the nominee would contribute to the work of the Panel. Please submit nominations to Alice Pau, Pharm.D., at the following address no later than October 9, 2009:

Alice K. Pau, Pharm.D.
Executive Secretary, Division of Clinical Research
NIAID-NIH, Bldg 10, Rm 11C103
Bethesda, MD 20892

or e-mail: apau@niaid.nih.gov.
 

Nominations Now Being Accepted for New Community Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents

The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (or the Panel) is accepting nominations for new community representative(s) to serve a 4-year term beginning February 2010 with potential for reappointment. The Panel welcomes diversified representation in the community membership reflecting the demographics of the current HIV epidemic in the United States. The community member may assist the Panel in identifying and addressing unique treatment aspects that relate to the constituency he/she represents. The candidate will have knowledge and involvement in issues related to HIV infection in adults, as evidenced by experience in HIV treatment education/advocacy or clinical/public policy initiatives related to HIV treatment.

The Panel is a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health. The Panel is comprised of approximately 30 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, DHHS representatives, and community representatives with expertise in HIV management in the United States. The Panel meets monthly via teleconferencing and annually in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy and revise the “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents.” The guideline is a living document that can be found at http://AIDSinfo.nih.gov. This document is downloaded more than 5,000 times a day and is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers.

Panel members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is generally not provided.

The nomination should include a curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or a letter of interest with specific reference to how the nominee would contribute to the work of the Panel. Please submit nominations to Alice Pau, Pharm.D., at the following address no later than October 9, 2009:

Alice K. Pau, Pharm.D.
Executive Secretary, Division of Clinical Research
NIAID-NIH, Bldg 10, Rm 11C103
Bethesda, MD 20892

or e-mail: apau@niaid.nih.gov.
 

 

New Targets for HIV Vaccine Identified

“The discovery of immune system particles that attack the AIDS virus may finally open a way to make a vaccine that could protect people against the deadly and incurable infection …

“They used new technology to troll through the blood of 1,800 people infected with the AIDS virus and identified two immune system compounds called antibodies that could neutralize the virus.

“And they found a new part of the virus that the antibodies attack, offering a new way to design a vaccine, they reported in the journal Science....

“ ‘The findings themselves are an exciting advance toward the goal of an effective AIDS vaccine because now we've got a new, potentially better target on HIV to focus our efforts for vaccine design,’ [said] Wayne Koff of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, or IAVI, which sponsored the study.”

More information is available:

Study: Risk Factors for Thrombocytopenia in Era of Potent Antiretroviral Therapy include Hepatitis C Virus Infection, Cirrhosis, and Uncontrolled HIV Replication

“Before potent antiretroviral therapy, thrombocytopenia was observed frequently. Little is known about risk factors for or severity and consequences of thrombocytopenia since establishment of highly effective therapy for HIV… We conducted a retrospective-matched case-control study of HIV-infected adult outpatients with and without thrombocytopenia to elucidate the contribution of HIV viremia, hepatitis C infection, and other potential risk factors for thrombocytopenia…Thrombocytopenia in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy is associated with hepatitis C virus infection, cirrhosis, and uncontrolled HIV replication, and serious complications including major bleeding and death.”

More information is available:

CDC: Effective Antiretroviral Therapy May Reduce Transmission Risk of HIV

“Because of [antiretroviral (ART)] medications, many HIV-infected persons are able to reduce levels of virus in the bloodstream (plasma viral load) to undetectable levels. Data suggest that HIV-infected persons with undetectable viral load are less infectious, and may be less likely to transmit HIV via sexual contact....

“Use of ART may be a promising tool for slowing the transmission of HIV within populations if prevention benefits are not offset by increases in risk behavior. Success of such a program will depend critically upon 1) widespread testing and early identification of infected persons, 2) ongoing counseling to support maintenance of safer sexual behaviors, 3) adequate clinical follow-up to monitor for adverse effects of ART, and 4) geographic and financial accessibility of treatment for affected persons….

“The risk of sexual HIV transmission is substantially reduced for individual couples in which the infected partner is on effective ART and has achieved undetectable plasma HIV viral load, but is not completely eliminated. Sexual transmission of HIV may still occur when the infected partner is on effective ART. In February 2008, CDC issued a statement reiterating its previous recommendations that people living with HIV who are sexually active use condoms consistently and correctly with all sexual partners.”

More information is available:

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