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AIDSInfo-at-a-glance

Issue No. 39 | September 25, 2009
A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesView HTML version
News and Features 

Investigational HIV Vaccine Regimen Shows Modest Effect in Preventing HIV Infection

“In an encouraging development, an investigational vaccine regimen has been shown to be well-tolerated and to have a modest effect in preventing HIV infection in a clinical trial involving more than 16,000 adult participants in Thailand. Following a final analysis of the trial data, the Surgeon General of the U.S. Army, the trial sponsor, announced today that the prime-boost investigational vaccine regimen was safe and 31 percent effective in preventing HIV infection.

 “'These new findings represent an important step forward in HIV vaccine research,' says Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the NIH, which provided major funding and other support for the study. 'For the first time, an investigational HIV vaccine has demonstrated some ability to prevent HIV infection among vaccinated individuals. Additional research is needed to better understand how this vaccine regimen reduced the risk of HIV infection, but certainly this is an encouraging advance for the HIV vaccine field.'”

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Combined Phenotypic and Genotypic Resistance Test for HIV-1 Integrase and Reverse Transcriptase Validated

"With the approval of the first HIV-1 integrase inhibitor raltegravir and a second one in phase III clinical development (elvitegravir), genotypic and phenotypic resistance assays are required to guide antiretroviral therapy and to investigate treatment failure. In this study, a genotypic and phenotypic recombinant virus assay was validated for determining resistance against integrase inhibitors. The assays are based on the amplification of a region encompassing not only HIV-1 integrase, but also reverse transcriptase and RNAseH.... Both B and non-B HIV-1 subtypes could be genotyped successfully (93%; 52/56 and 100%; 49/49, respectively) and reproducibly. The phenotypic assay showed a high success rate (96.5%; 139/144) for subtype B (100%; 19/19) and non-B subtypes (92%; 45/49), and was found to be accurate and reproducible as assessed using well-characterized integrase mutants.... In summary, a genotypic and phenotypic integrase resistance assay was validated successfully for accuracy, reproducibility, analytical and clinical sensitivity, and dynamic range."

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September 27 is National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

"On Sept. 27, the second annual National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, we pause to mourn the hundreds of thousands of gay and bisexual men who have died with AIDS, and we strengthen our resolve to end this terrible scourge.

"In the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States, the virus wreaked most of its initial devastation in this community, cutting short the promising lives of numerous young people and causing heartbreak among the friends and family members of those who became infected and had no good medicines to fight the virus. Since the disease was first recognized in the early 1980s, more than 487,000 gay and bisexual men in the United States have been diagnosed with AIDS, and more than 274,000 have died.

"The epidemic continues to affect gay and bisexual men to a degree that far surpasses their proportion of the U.S. population. Although only a small percentage of American men report having sex with other men, at the end of 2006, men who have sex with men accounted for 64 percent of all men in the United States living with HIV and more than half of all new U.S. HIV/AIDS infections."

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Nominations are Being Accepted for New Scientific/Clinical Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents

The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (or the Panel) is currently accepting nominations for new scientific/clinical members with expertise in HIV medicine. The Panel is particularly, although not exclusively, seeking candidates with expertise in neurologic complications of HIV infection. The candidates must be recognized experts in HIV medicine with outstanding records of publications and presentations in areas related to antiretroviral therapy. The successful candidates shall serve a 4-year term beginning February 2010, with potential for reappointment for an additional term.

The Panel is a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council (OARAC) of the National Institutes of Health. The Panel is comprised of approximately 30 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, DHHS representatives, and community representatives with expertise in HIV management in the United States. The Panel meets monthly via teleconferencing and annually in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy and revise the “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents.” The guidelines can be found as a living document on the AIDSinfo Web site. The document is downloaded more than 5,000 times a day and is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers.

Panel members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is generally not provided.

The nomination should include the nominee’s curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or letter of interest with specific reference to how the nominee would contribute to the work of the Panel. Please submit nominations to Alice Pau, Pharm.D., at the following address no later than October 9, 2009:

Alice K. Pau, Pharm.D.
Executive Secretary of the Panel, Division of Clinical Research
NIAID-NIH, Bldg 10, Rm 11C103
Bethesda, MD 20892

or e-mail: apau@niaid.nih.gov.
 

Nominations are Being Accepted for New Community Members for the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents

The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents (or the Panel) is accepting nominations for new community representatives to serve a 4-year term beginning February 2010 with potential for reappointment. The Panel welcomes diversified representation in the community membership reflecting the demographics of the current HIV epidemic in the United States. The community member may assist the Panel in identifying and addressing unique treatment aspects that relate to the constituency he/she represents.  The candidate will have knowledge and involvement in issues related to HIV infection in adults, as evidenced by experience in HIV treatment education/advocacy or clinical/public policy initiatives related to HIV treatment.

The Panel is a Working Group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council (OARAC) of the National Institutes of Health. The Panel is comprised of approximately 30 members who are clinicians, researchers, academicians, DHHS representatives, and community representatives with expertise in HIV management in the United States. The Panel meets monthly via teleconferencing and annually in a face-to-face meeting to review and critically evaluate emerging scientific data relating to antiretroviral therapy and revise the “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents.” The guidelines can be found as  a living document on the AIDSinfo Web site. The document is downloaded more than 5,000 times a day and is widely used by HIV practitioners and researchers.

Panel members are not compensated for their time commitment and travel support is generally not provided.

The nomination should include the nominee’s curriculum vitae and a letter of nomination or a letter of interest with specific reference to how the nominee would contribute to the work of the Panel. Please submit nominations to Alice Pau, Pharm.D., at the following address no later than October 9, 2009:

Alice K. Pau, Pharm.D.
Executive Secretary of the Panel, Division of Clinical Research
NIAID-NIH, Bldg 10, Rm 11C103
Bethesda, MD 20892

or e-mail: apau@niaid.nih.gov.
 

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