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AIDSInfo-at-a-glance

Issue No. 21 | May 18, 2012
A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesView HTML version
News and Features 

Join AIDSinfo in Observing HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

May 18, 2012, is the 15th annual observance of HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. This day provides an opportunity to recognize the volunteers, community members, health professionals, and scientists working together toward finding an HIV vaccine. This day is also an opportunity to educate communities across the United States about the importance of HIV vaccine research.

Two types of experimental HIV vaccines are currently being studied in clinical trials. Therapeutic HIV vaccines are designed to treat HIV-infected people. Preventive HIV vaccines are designed to prevent HIV infection in people who do not already have HIV. Even though no HIV vaccines are currently available or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), significant research is under way to develop an effective vaccine.

There is scientific evidence that a safe and effective HIV vaccine may be possible. For the first time, in a research study in Thailand, an experimental vaccine demonstrated some ability to prevent HIV infection among vaccinated individuals. The 2009 research findings represent an important advance in HIV vaccine research. More research is needed but the study results bring researchers a step closer to developing a broadly protective HIV vaccine.

AIDSinfo has developed a webpage for this awareness day with information and resources about HIV vaccine research.

More information is available:

Join AIDSinfo in Observing National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

May 19, 2012, marks the eighth annual National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. It is a day that serves to increase awareness of the impact of HIV/AIDS among the Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the United States.

According to the 2010 HIV Surveillance Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in the 46 states with confidential name-based HIV reporting, Native Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders had the third highest rate of new HIV diagnoses among racial and ethnic groups in 2010, following African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos. According to the HIV Surveillance by Race/Ethnicity slide set from CDC, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander males had a higher rate of HIV diagnoses than that of white males in 2010, and both Asian and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander females had a higher rate of HIV diagnoses than that of white females in 2010.

AIDSinfo has developed a webpage for this awareness day with information and resources about HIV/AIDS and the Asian and Pacific Islander communities.

More information is available:

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