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AIDSInfo-at-a-glance

Issue No. 18 | August 15, 2014
A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesView HTML version
News and Features 

AIDSinfo Glossary App Updated for iOS 7

The free AIDSinfo HIV/AIDS Glossary apps for Apple and Android devices provide on-the-go access to definitions for more than 700 HIV/AIDS-related terms in English and Spanish. The apps also include an audio feature so users can hear the correct pronunciation of each term.
 
The Glossary app for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch is now optimized for iOS7. The updated app features an iOS7-compatible look and feel and a new icon. The upgrade also included minor bug fixes.
 
Whether you are new to the Glossary app or a long-time user, download the latest, iOS7-optimized version of the app for your Apple device today. Feedback on the updated app is welcome. Please e-mail your comments to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov.
 

NIH-Led Scientists Boost Potential of Passive Immunization Against HIV

"Scientists are pursuing injections or intravenous infusions of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bNAbs) as a strategy for preventing HIV infection. This technique, called passive immunization, has been shown to protect monkeys from a monkey form of HIV called simian human immunodeficiency virus, or SHIV. To make passive immunization a widely feasible HIV prevention option for people, scientists want to modify bNAbs such that a modest amount of them is needed only once every few months.

"To that end, an NIH-led team of scientists has mutated the powerful anti-HIV bNAb called VRC01 so that, once infused into monkeys, it lasts three times longer in blood than unmutated VRC01, collects in rectal mucosal tissue, and persists there more than twice as long as unmutated VRC01. Concentrating anti-HIV bNAbs at mucosal surfaces of the rectum and vagina, the subject of additional study, is critical for blocking sexual transmission of HIV.

"In addition, the scientists found, a low-dose infusion of mutated VRC01 protected monkeys against SHIV infection more effectively than a low-dose infusion of unmutated VRC01."

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