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AIDSInfo-at-a-glance

Issue No. 7 | March 28, 2014
A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesView HTML version
News and Features 

Updated HHS Perinatal Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines Released

The HHS Panel on Treatment of HIV-Infected Pregnant Women and Prevention of Perinatal Transmission announces the release of the updated Recommendations for Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant HIV-1-Infected Women for Maternal Health and Interventions to Reduce Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States.

For a complete preview of key updates to the guidelines, please see What's New in the Guidelines. Additions and revisions are also highlighted in yellow throughout the text and tables of the guidelines.

To view or download the guidelines, go to the Perinatal Guidelines section of AIDSinfo. Separate PDF files of the tables or recommendations can also be downloaded from the page.

Your Feedback Is Welcome

Feedback on the latest revisions to the Recommendations for Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant HIV-1-Infected Women for Maternal Health and Interventions to Reduce Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States is welcome. Please send your comments with the subject line “Comments on Perinatal Guidelines” to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov by April 11, 2014.

NIH Grantees Sharpen Understanding of Antibodies That May Cut Risk of HIV Infection

“What immune response should a vaccine elicit to prevent HIV infection? Two studies published online today [March 19, 2014] bring scientists closer to answering this question by identifying previously unrecognized attributes of antibodies that appear to have reduced the risk of HIV infection in the only clinical trial to show efficacy, albeit modest, of an experimental vaccine regimen in people.

Earlier analyses of the results of that trial, known as RV144, suggested that antibodies to sites within a part of the HIV envelope called V1V2 correlated with reduced risk of HIV infection. These antibodies belong to a class called immunoglobulin G, or IgG. The new studies by two independent laboratories both found that only one subclass of V1V2-directed IgG antibodies—the IgG3 subclass—is associated with antiviral responses linked to the reduced risk of HIV infection seen in RV144. …  

“More research is needed to determine whether V1V2-directed IgG3 antibodies actually protected some vaccinees from HIV infection, as well as whether there was a relationship between the fast decline in IgG3 antibodies and the sharp drop in efficacy of the investigational RV144 vaccines. Information from the current and ongoing studies will help scientists refine their efforts to design and test HIV vaccines that build on the success of RV144.” 

More information is available:

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