HIV/AIDS News

HIV/AIDS Statistics

Date: September 1, 2002
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Author: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

HIV/AIDS WORLDWIDE

  • As of the end of 2001, an estimated 40 million people worldwide ¿ 37.1 million adults and 3.0 million children younger than 15 years ¿ were living with HIV/AIDS. More than 70 percent of these people (28.5 million) live in Sub-Saharan Africa; another 14 percent (5.6 million) live in South and Southeast Asia.(1)
  • Worldwide, approximately one in every 100 adults aged 15 to 49 is HIV-infected. In Sub-Saharan Africa, about 9 percent of all adults in this age group are HIV-infected. In 12 African countries, the prevalence of HIV infection among adults aged 15 to 49 exceeds 10 percent.(1)
  • Approximately 50 percent of adults living with HIV/AIDS worldwide are women.(1)
  • An estimated 5 million new HIV infections occurred worldwide during 2001; that is, about 14,000 infections each day. More than 95 percent of these new infections occurred in developing countries.(1)
  • In 2001, approximately 6,000 young people aged 15 to 24 became infected with HIV every day ¿ that is, about five every minute.(1)
  • In 2001 alone, HIV/AIDS-associated illnesses caused the deaths of approximately 3 million people worldwide, including an estimated 580,000 children younger than 15 years.(1)
  • Worldwide, more than 80 percent of all adult HIV infections have resulted from heterosexual intercourse.(1)
    HIV/AIDS IN THE UNITED STATES
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 850,000 to 950,000 U.S. residents are living with HIV infection, one-quarter of whom are unaware of their infection.(2)
  • Approximately 40,000 new HIV infections occur each year in the United States, about 70 percent among men and 30 percent among women. Of these newly infected people, half are younger than 25 years of age.(3,4)
  • Of new infections among men in the United States, CDC estimates that approximately 60 percent of men were infected through homosexual sex, 25 percent through injection drug use, and 15 percent through heterosexual sex. Of newly infected men, approximately 50 percent are black, 30 percent are white, 20 percent are Hispanic, and a small percentage are members of other racial/ethnic groups.(4)
  • Of new infections among women in the United States, CDC estimates that approximately 75 percent of women were infected through heterosexual sex and 25 percent through injection drug use. Of newly infected women, approximately 64 percent are black, 18 percent are white, 18 percent are Hispanic, and a small percentage are members of other racial/ethnic groups.(4)
  • In the United States, 816,149 cases of AIDS had been reported to the CDC through December 2001.(5)
  • The estimated number of new adult/adolescent AIDS cases diagnosed in the United States was 60,805 in 1996, 49,646 in 1997, 42,832 in 1998, 41,165 in 1999, 40,766 in 2000, and 41,311 in 2001.(5)
  • The estimated number of new pediatric AIDS cases (cases among individuals younger than age 13) in the United States fell from 954 in 1992 to 101 in 2001.(5)
  • The rate of adult/adolescent AIDS cases reported in the United States in 2001 (per 100,000 population) was 76.3 among blacks, 28.0 among Hispanics, 11.7 among American Indians/Alaska Natives, 7.9 among whites, and 4.8 among Asians/Pacific Islanders.(5)
  • From 1985 to 2001, the proportion of adult/adolescent AIDS cases in the United States reported in women increased from 7 percent to 25 percent.(5)
  • As of the end of 2001, an estimated 362,827 people in the United States were living with AIDS.(5)
  • As of December 31, 2001, 467,910 deaths among people with AIDS had been reported to the CDC.(5) AIDS is now the fifth leading cause of death in the United States among people aged 25 to 44, and is the leading cause of death for black men in this age group.(6)
  • The estimated annual number of AIDS-related deaths in the United States fell approximately 70 percent from 1995 to 2001, from 51,670 deaths in 1995 to 15,603 deaths in 2001.(5)
  • Of the estimated 15,603 AIDS-related deaths in the United States in 2001, approximately 52 percent were among blacks, 29 percent among whites, 18 percent among Hispanics, and less than 1 percent among Asians/Pacific Islanders and American Indians/Alaska Natives.(5)

REFERENCES

  1. UNAIDS. Report on the Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic, 2002: "The Barcelona Report".
  2. Fleming, P.L. et al. HIV Prevalence in the United States, 2000. 9th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Wash., Feb. 24-28, 2002. Abstract 11.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV and AIDS - United States, 1981-2001. MMWR 2001;50:430-434.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV Prevention Strategic Plan Through 2005. January 2001.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report 2001;13(no.2):1-44.
  6. Deaths: Final data for 2000. National Vital Statistics Reports; vol. 50, no. 15. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics, 2002.

NIAID is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIAID supports basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose, and treat infectious and immune-mediated illnesses, including HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, illness from potential agents of bioterrorism, tuberculosis, malaria, autoimmune disorders, asthma and allergies.

Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services