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Unrecognized HIV Infection, Risk Behavior, and Perceptions of Risk Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex with Men -- Six U.S. Cities, 1994-1998

Date: August 23, 2002
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5133a1.htm

Synopsis for August 23, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until 12 Noon, ET, Thursdays.

Telebriefing, August 22, 2002

WHO: Dr. Lyle Peterson, West Nile virus expert

WHAT: To discuss the MMWR article on West Nile Virus activity in the United States and Mississippi. Brief remarks followed by Q/A.

WHEN: Thursday, August 22, 2002; NOON ET

WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942

Teleconference name: CDC

A full transcript will be available today following the teleconference at http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/.

This teleconference will also be audio webcast. Listen LIVE online at http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/.

This CDC analysis of African American men who have sex with men (MSM), aged 15-22 years, follows the release of preliminary findings from CDC's Young Men's Survey.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications
CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895

Preliminary findings from the Young Men's Survey were released at the XIV International AIDS Conference in July 2002, which found that the vast majority of young HIV-infected MSM, particularly African Americans, are unaware of their infection. To better understand factors contributing to lack of knowledge of HIV status, researchers examined the frequency of HIV testing and reasons for avoiding testing among the 920 young African American MSM in the study. Study findings indicate that while roughly two-thirds of young African American MSM reported previously testing for HIV, the majority (approximately 75 percent) reported having only two or fewer tests in their lifetimes despite reporting considerable risk behavior.