<![CDATA[ AIDSinfo At-a-Glance: Offering Information on HIV/AIDS Treatment, Prevention, and Research, A Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive60<![CDATA[NLM-Authored Journal Article Describes Trends in HIV Language Use]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/6/14Trends in HIV Terminology: Text Mining and Data Visualization Assessment of International AIDS Conference Abstracts Over 25 Years, an article describing research on the evolving use of HIV-related language, was recently published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance. The article is authored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) staff who conducted the study.

The article describes the text mining and data visualization approach NLM used to analyze trends in HIV language use. Discussion of the study results links the addition, disappearance, and changing use of HIV terminology to corresponding advances in HIV research and efforts to destigmatize HIV. The article includes terminology recommendations to further effective, non-stigmatizing communication about HIV, especially between health care providers and people living with HIV.

Read the journal article to learn more about this study.

 

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Thu, 14 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[ June 27 is National HIV Testing Day]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/6/14Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about one in seven people in the United States who have HIV don’t know that they are HIV positive. National HIV Testing Day is an annual occasion to encourage people to take an HIV test. CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care. People with certain risk factors should get tested more often. To learn more, visit the AIDSinfo National HIV Testing Day webpage [en español].

 

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Thu, 14 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
<![CDATA[ Recent HIV News from NIAID]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/6/14
  • June 4, 2018: HIV Vaccine Elicits Antibodies in Animals That Neutralize Dozens of HIV Strains
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    Thu, 14 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[HHS Antiretroviral Guidelines Panels Issue Recommendations Regarding the Use of Dolutegravir in Adults and Adolescents With HIV Who Are Pregnant or of Child-Bearing Potential]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/30A National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded observational surveillance study of birth outcomes among pregnant women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana identified neural tube defects (NTDs) in four infants born to 426 women who initiated a dolutegravir (DTG)-based regimen prior to pregnancy, and who were still receiving it at the time of conception. This study is ongoing, and more data from approximately 600 additional births among pregnant women who have been using a DTG-based regimen from conception are expected in the next 9 months. Importantly, the same study presented data on women who initiated ART during the first trimester of pregnancy, and no NTDs were identified in the infants of the 116 women who initiated a DTG-based regimen in the first trimester or in 396 women who initiated an efavirenz (EFV)-based regimen. In the upcoming months, data from this study and other investigations will provide more information about the safety of DTG for infants exposed in utero

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Antiretroviral Guidelines Panels are issuing these recommendations to elaborate on our previous statement of May 18, 2018, and to support the related Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Drug Safety Communication.

    For more information and to view the recommendations, visit the AIDSinfo website.

     

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    Wed, 30 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[ AIDSinfo Updates Consumer Fact Sheets on HIV Prevention]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/30The updated AIDSinfo consumer fact sheets provide important information on HIV prevention. Each fact sheet includes a summary of key points and links to additional information and resources.


    View the updated fact sheets:

    Visit infoSIDA to view the fact sheets in Spanish.

     

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    Wed, 30 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[ Adult and Adolescent Opportunistic Infections Guidelines Updated]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/30On May 29, updates to the following sections of the Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents were published:

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    Wed, 30 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[ June 5 is HIV Long-Term Survivors Day]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/30The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1.1 million people in the United States were living with HIV at the end of 2015. A lot of these people have been living with HIV for many years. June 5 is a day set aside to honor HIV long-term survivors and to raise awareness of their needs and issues. To learn more, visit the AIDSinfo HIV Long-Term Survivors Day webpage [en español].

     

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    Wed, 30 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[HHS Pediatric Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines Updated]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/22

    The HHS Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of Children Living with HIV (the Panel) has released an updated version of the Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection.


    Some of the key guideline updates include:
    • In the Introduction, the Panel describes the process of coordinating with the authors of the Perinatal Guidelines to jointly develop the three sections of the Pediatric Antiretroviral (ARV) Treatment Guidelines that are shared with the Perinatal Guidelines.
    • The Panel now recommends performing viral load measurements every 3 to 4 months to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and disease progression. The list of bulleted recommendations in Clinical and Laboratory Monitoring of Pediatric HIV Infection has been updated to reflect this change.
    • The recommendations in When to Initiate Therapy in Antiretroviral-Naive Children have been revised. The Panel now recommends that all children receive ART, regardless of symptoms or CD4 T lymphocyte count.
    • An additional column and footnotes indicating which drugs are available in fixed-dose combination (FDC) formulations were added to Table 7 in What to Start: Regimens Recommended for Initial Therapy of Antiretroviral-Naive Children.
    • Didanosine and stavudine are no longer recommended for use in ARV regimens, due to the significant toxicities of these drugs and the availability of safer agents. Table 9 and Table 10 in What Not to Start: Regimens Not Recommended for Initial Therapy of Antiretroviral-Naive Children have been updated accordingly.
    • Considerations About Interruptions in Antiretroviral Therapy now includes issues that may contribute to interrupted treatment in children from limited resource settings and emphasizes the need to plan for potential interruptions.
    • A number of the drug sections in Appendix A: Pediatric Antiretroviral Drug Information now include new pediatric data and dosing and safety information, as well as new drug formulations and FDCs.

    For a complete list of guideline updates, please see What's New in the Guidelines. Additions and revisions are also highlighted in yellow throughout the PDF version of the guidelines.


    To view or download the guidelines, go to the Pediatric ARV Guidelines section of AIDSinfo. Separate PDF files that contain only the guideline tables or the boxed recommendations can also be downloaded from the page.


    Send Comments on the Revised Guidelines to AIDSinfo

    Feedback on the revised Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection is welcome. Please email your comments with the subject line “Comments on the Pediatric ARV Guidelines” to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov by June 5, 2018.

     

     

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    Tue, 22 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[AIDSinfo Highlights Two May HIV/AIDS Awareness Days]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/17
    May 18: HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

    HIV Vaccine Awareness Day is an occasion to highlight HIV vaccine research and recognize the many volunteers, community members, health professionals, and scientists involved in this important research. To learn more, visit the AIDSinfo HIV Vaccine Awareness Day webpage [en español].


    May 19: National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day was founded to end the silence and shame surrounding HIV and AIDS in Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the United States and to encourage community members to get tested for HIV. To learn more, browse the AIDSinfo National Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day webpage [en español].

     

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    Thu, 17 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
    <![CDATA[ Recent HIV News from NIH]]>https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/e-news/archive/2018/5/17
  • May 7, 2018: NIH Clinical Trial to Track Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation from HIV-Positive Donors to HIV-Positive Recipients
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    Thu, 17 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT